Saudi police detained a young woman for violating modesty rules after she removed her abaya, the loose-fitting, full-length robes women are required to wear, on a main street in the capital Riyadh, local media reported on Monday.

The conservative Muslim country enforces a strict dress code for women in public, bans them from driving and prohibits the mixing of sexes.

Read the Full Article: Source – Reuters
Time For Truth: (Reuters) – Saudi police detain young woman for removing abaya - media

Read More


A woman in Saudi Arabia is facing calls for her execution after a photo of her appearing in public without wearing a hijab was posted on social media. According to reports, Malak Al Shehri posted the photo of herself in the Saudi capital of Riyadh wearing a dark coat covering a floral dress, dark sunglasses — but no hijab, or abaya, a traditional body covering worn by women in Saudi Arabia. The backlash came swift and fierce with some people calling for her death and others calling for her imprisonment.

Read the Full Article: Source – The New York Times
Time For Truth: (The New York Times) – People demand woman’s execution after she posted this photo on social media

Read More


“It shouldn’t be a big deal,” Ginella Massa says of hosting CityNews in a traditional Muslim headscarf.
Canada suddenly has its first hijab-wearing news anchor on commercial television.

Read the Full Article: Source – Hollywood Reporter
Time For Truth: (Hollywood Reporter) – Meet Canada's First Hijab-Wearing TV News Anchor

Read More


Twitter has verified an official English account of the Muslim Brotherhood, despite the platform’s pledge to fight hate speech. Multiple countries have designated the organization as a terrorist group.

On Saturday, Twitter awarded the Muslim Brotherhood a “verification check”, normally given to legitimate and prominent accounts on the platform. The reason for verification remains unclear due to Twitter’s policy of not commenting on individual accounts.

Read More


The House of Lords has passed the Investigatory Powers Bill, putting the huge spying powers on their way to becoming law within weeks. The bill – which forces internet companies to keep records on their users for up to a year, and allows the Government to force companies to hack into or break things they’ve sold so they can be spied on – has been fought against by privacy campaigners and technology companies including Apple and Twitter.

Read More

1 2 3 31