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Some of the top-selling brands of fitness trackers that monitor wearers’ heart rates, sleeping patterns and movement are putting user data and privacy at risk, according to a new report.

Cybersecurity researchers at the University of Toronto examined eight popular wrist-worn trackers. They tested how they communicate with mobile apps and even upload and store a user’s workout information on manufacturers’ computer servers.

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The researchers conclude that several models expose users to potential internet snoops and hackers even when devices aren’t being used for exercise and mobile apps are turned off.

Read the Full Article: Source – CBC
Time For Truth: (CBC) – Some fitness trackers vulnerable to monitoring, U of T study finds

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Earlier this year AT&T and Verizon were caught modifying wireless user traffic to inject unique identifier headers (UIDH). This allowed the carriers to ignore a user’s privacy preferences on the browser level and track all online behavior. In Verizon’s case, the practice wasn’t discovered for two years after implementation, and the carrier only integrated a working opt out mechanism only after another six months of public criticism. Verizon and AT&T of course denied that these headers could be abused by third parties. Shortly thereafter it was illustrated that it was relatively easy for these headers to be abused by third parties.

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