A salty ocean is lurking beneath the surface of Jupiter’s largest moon, Ganymede, scientists using the Hubble Space Telescope have found.

The ocean on Ganymede—which is buried under a thick crust of ice—could actually harbor more water than all of Earth’s surface water combined, according to NASA officials. Scientists think the ocean is about 60 miles (100 kilometers) thick, 10 times the depth of Earth’s oceans, NASA added. The new Hubble Space Telescope finding could also help scientists learn more about the plethora of potentially watery worlds that exist in the solar system and beyond.

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Checking your Facebook status or sending an Instagram photo from space could become reality, as a group of researchers from MIT and NASA believe they have come up with a way of establishing a decent wireless connection between Earth and the Moon.

The two organizations have demonstrated for the first time that data communication technology can provide people in space, with the same sort of internet connectivity that we enjoy at home. It would not take hours to send a simple message either, as the team says it is possible to process large data transfers and even high definition video streaming.

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In 1967 British astronomer Jocelyn Bell Burnell was left stunned by mysterious pulsing signals she detected coming from outside the solar system.

For months she suggested the signals could be of an extraterrestrial intelligent origin, but they were later proven to be rapidly spinning stars known as pulsars.

However, a new series of mysterious signals, known as Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), has again got astronomers scratching their heads and wondering if, maybe, we’re picking up alien messages.

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The Great Red Spot on Jupiter is the planet’s most defining feature — and humanity has been watching it for a while. There is speculation that a mention of Jupiter’s “permanent spot” from writings in the 1600s are a reference to the raging storm. And in the 1800s, observations of the spot put its measurement at about 25,476 miles wide — which would be big enough to engulf three Earths.

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