Lois Lunsk underwent surgery nine years ago to remove her thyroid and a number of lymph nodes. Following the operation, she was given a dose of radioactive iodine capsules and forced to spend three days in isolation in a room lined with lead, because her body was emitting such a high amount of radiation.

Read More


IN 2011, residents across an American community in St Louis began to notice a chain of inexplicably high incidents of cancer and disease across its population.

For decades, both former and current residents from approximately 90 municipalities in the Missouri city were diagnosed with a long list of life-threatening illnesses, including leukaemia, lupus, brain tumours, appendix cancer, multiple sclerosis, birth defects and many more. People died. Babies died. And they’re still dying to this day, dubbed “the poison children of Coldwater Creek.”

Read More


There is growing fear in a suburban St. Louis community over a potential threat buried in the ground. A local landfill contains nuclear waste and just three football fields away, a “hot spot” has been burning underground in a second landfill.

High number of cancer cases near St. Louis prompts concern
Federal officials insist the so-called “smoldering event” is contained, and not advancing towards the waste. But nearby residents have lived with both the burn and the waste for years, and they say they are fed up, reports CBS News correspondent Vinita Nair.

Read More


For the first time since the 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster, residents of a certain town can return full-time if they wish.

The Japanese government on Saturday lifted an evacuation order for the small town of Naraha, about 16 kilometers (10 miles) south of the crippled Fukushima Daiichi plant in Fukushima prefecture, Japan’s Kyodo news agency reported.

Read More

1 2 3 5