South Korea said on Saturday that North Korea’s nuclear capability is expanding fast, echoing alarm around the world over the isolated state’s fifth and biggest nuclear test, carried out in defiance of U.N. sanctions.

North Korea conducted the test on Friday and said it had mastered the ability to mount a warhead on a ballistic missile, ratcheting up a threat that rivals and the United Nations have been powerless to contain.

Read the Full Article: Source – Reuters
Time For Truth: (Reuters) – South Korea says North's nuclear capability 'speeding up', calls for action

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The UN General Assembly session opened on September 15. This year the organisation celebrates its 70th birthday but how has the UN had an impact on the world’s conflicts?

United Nations peacekeeping operations began in 1948 and the light blue helmets and berets have been deployed to many of the world’s trouble spot from Papua New Guinea to Haiti ever since, with varying levels of effectiveness.

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A year after fighters from Islamic State stormed into Iraq’s second-biggest city of Mosul, the group maintains a tight grip on its population.

Some of those who have managed to escape have spoken to the BBC about how the city fell and how the extremist group maintains control over its people.

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Britain’s leading public health doctor today blames the failure to find a vaccine against the Ebola virus on the “moral bankruptcy” of the pharmaceutical industry to invest in a disease because it has so far only affected people in Africa – despite hundreds of deaths.

Professor John Ashton, the president of the UK Faculty of Public Health, says the West needs to treat the deadly virus as if it were taking hold in the wealthiest parts of London rather than just Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia. Writing in The Independent on Sunday, Professor Ashton compares the international response to Ebola to that of Aids, which was killing people in Africa for years before treatments were developed once it had spread to the US and UK in the 1980s.

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At the beginning of this year, Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan said it’s only a matter of time before his government defeats Islamist militant group Boko Haram. “Boko Haram insurgency is a temporary challenge… We will surely overcome Boko Haram.”

Even then, in January, these bold words rang hollow (and it didn’t help the tense sectarian atmosphere that the president was speaking from a Church of Christ pulpit). Having abandoned any form of diplomacy, Jonathan’s administration was eight months into an all-out military offensive against Boko Haram in its northern strongholds. Three states were, and remain, under a State of Emergency, with curfews in place and mobile phone signals interrupted to disrupt communications. The army was out in force, hunting the militants down, while air force bombers harassed them from the air.

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