American and British spy agencies have tried to intercept data from passengers’ mobile phones on commercial airlines including Air France, media reports say, citing documents from US whistleblower Edward Snowden.

The French flag-carrier was an early target of the US National Security Agency and its British counterpart GCHQ as it was seen as a terrorist mark and it carried out tests in 2007 on allowing the use of mobile phones on its aircraft.

Read the Full Article: Source – Yahoo News
Time For Truth: (Yahoo News) – US, UK spies targeted airline passengers' mobiles: report

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Mobile phones in India must include a panic-button from the start of next year and satellite-based location technology from 2018, as officials try to make the nation safer for women.

The emergency feature would be activated by pressing a designated key on a smartphone or holding down the numbers ‘5’ or ‘9’ on a basic device, according to a statement from the telecommunications ministry in New Delhi late Monday. All manufacturers, including companies such as Apple Inc. and Samsung Electronics Co., would need to comply.

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Edward Snowden, the whistleblower whose NSA revelations sparked a debate on mass surveillance, has waded into the arguments over the FBI’s attempt to force Apple to help it unlock the iPhone 5C of one of the San Bernardino shooters.

The FBI says that only Apple can deactivate certain passcode protections on the iPhone, which will allow law enforcement to guess the passcode by using brute-force.

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The hype around the Internet of Things has been rising steadily over the past five years. In tech analyst Gartner’s Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies report in 2015, the IoT is at the peak of “inflated expectations”, particularly for areas like the smart home, which involve controlling your lights, thermostat or TV using your mobile phone.

But the era of sensors has only just dawned, according to renowned technology investor and internet pioneer Marc Andreessen. In 10 years, he predicts mobile phones themselves could disappear.

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Fears over the disruption to classrooms from pupils using smartphones have prompted the Government to commission a review into the way technology affects behaviour in schools.

Children should not be allowed smartphones until they are 16, according to Tom Bennett, the school behaviour expert leading the review. And teachers should not allow them unless absolutely necessary, says Mr Bennett, who is already leading another review into how teachers are trained to tackle bad behaviour.

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