On Oct. 24, a 4-year-old girl went missing from her home in the Charaideo district of upper Assam, a mostly tribal state in northeast India.

Last Monday, the child’s body was found in a forest about 75 to 90 yards from the Ratanpur tea estate where she lived with her parents. She had been decapitated and her arms had been severed.

Read the Full Article: Source – The Washington Post
Time For Truth: (The Washington Post) – ‘Black witch priest’ in India dismembers 4-year-old in sacrifice to find teen’s missing cellphone

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Last weekend’s reports about the New Zealand rugby team’s discovery of a listening device sewn in to a hotel meeting room chair, have illustrated just how much spying technology has advanced in recent years.

These days, you don’t need to sit outside in a van with your headphones on, listening to static for an hour before the battery runs out and the tape recorder gives a tell-tale clunk.

Read the Full Article: Source – 10 News
Time For Truth: (10 News) – Are hi-tech spies stealing all your firm's secrets?

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To get a glimpse of the future of commerce in America, look no further than Sweden.

The Scandinavian country is largely a cashless society, with consumers relying on mobile phone payments or plastic. While the U.S. is still far from achieving the same level of cash-free existence, increasing numbers of restaurants and retailers are now snubbing the lowly dollar bill.

Some merchants such as SweetGreen, a salad chain, refuse to open their registers for cash, telling customers they can pay only with mobile payments or cards. With some newer vending machines, only a card or mobile wallet will get that cold Coca-Cola to roll down the chute.

Read the Full Article: Source – CBS News
Time For Truth: (CBS News) – Stores to customers: "Cash not welcome here"

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New Russian technologies, including phonecall interception and a facial recognition app, have stirred a fierce debate about privacy and data monitoring.

Infowatch, a Moscow-based IT security company managed by businesswoman Natalya Kasperskaya, found itself in hot water last month after it revealed it had invented a system that companies can use to intercept employees’ mobile phone conversations.

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security

In January 2014, a Massachusetts cop was swearing into his mobile phone while working a traffic detail at a construction site.

The F bombs appeared to upset an elderly lady walking by, so a man on a nearby front porch asked the officer, Thomas Barboza, to stop swearing.

The cop’s response: “Shut the f–k up and mind your own business.”

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