Illegal and unreported fishing is a multibillion-dollar business around the globe, and one that has proven notoriously difficult to combat. In part, that’s because it involves a constant stream of renegade fishermen being pursued by countries that have only limited resources to carry out a perpetual cat-and-mouse game on the high seas.

Read the Full Article: Source – The Washington Post
Time For Truth: (The Washington Post) – How Google is helping to crack down on illegal fishing — from space

Read More


A reform of Spaniards’ right to demonstrate has brought condemnation that it will stifle freedom of speech and assembly, and allow police to fine ‘offenders’ without a trial.

The Spanish Citizens’ Security Law under the Penal Code comes into force this July 1.

Read More


Natalia Álvarez isn’t plotting to overthrow Venezuela’s government – she’s just fed up with the lack of running water in the Caracas housing complex where she lives, and of having to stand for hours in line at the supermarket to buy basic subsidised goods such as flour, cooking oil and milk.

But she doesn’t dare protest openly: her neighbourhood – 23 De Enero – is a stronghold of support for the leftwing governments of the late Hugo Chávez and his successor, Nicolás Maduro.

Read More


One of the most popular computer manufacturers Lenovo is being criticized for selling laptops pre-installed with invasive marketing software, or malware that, experts say, opens up a door for hackers and cyber crooks.

The software, dubbed ‘Superfish Malware’, analyzes users’ Internet habits and injects third-party advertising into websites on browsers such as Google Chrome and Internet Explorer based on that activities without the user’s permission.

Security researchers recently discovered Superfish Malware presents onto new consumer-grade Lenovo computers sold before January of 2015. When taken out of the box for the first time, the adware gets activated and because it comes pre-installed, Lenovo customers might end up using it inadvertently.

Read More


The opening scenes of Hajooj Kuka’s film, Beats of the Antonov, are as surreal as they are uplifting. As families scramble for cover against the government’s Antonov bomber planes, which continue their reign of terror on the people of the Blue Nile and Nuba Mountains in southern Sudan, the unlikely sound of giggling cuts through the drone and crackle of destruction.

“The laughter is always there,” says the documentary’s narrator. “People laugh despite the catastrophe as they realise they are not hurt.”

Read More