meat

The future of lab-grown meat is coming. Or at least it feels that way, based on burgeoning interest in the biotech community. One by one, companies are staking out different animal tissues to grow in vitro for human consumption. First there was beef. Then there was chicken. Now there’s pork.

San Fransisco-based startup Memphis Meats made its public debut today, with a Wall Street Journal exclusive that details the team’s ambitious plan to grow beef and pork in laboratory bioreactors—and to be the first company to bring lab-grown meat to market. Memphis Meats says it’ll be selling its animal-free products to high-end customers in three to four years. Oh, and to dissuade any lingering doubts, they’ve also just unveiled the world’s first lab-grown meatball.

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farm

The fruit and veg that graces our plates today would have been unrecognisable to our ancestors, researchers have revealed.

A new series of pictures shows what everything from the watermelon to the banana originally looked like.

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zikavirus

The Zika virus outbreak currently gripping the Americas could have been sparked by the release of genetically modified mosquitoes in 2012, critics say.

The insects were engineered by biotechnology experts to combat the spread of dengue fever and other diseases and released into the general population of Brazil in 2012.

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Thousands of our fans, including those with March Against Monsanto, have found this post to be blocked on Facebook. Why is this being blocked? When I tried to post this article to both the Natural Society page and my Anthony Gucciardi Facebook page I was met with a warning that this post was blocked due to ‘security measures.’ Needless to say, this raised many questions. What do you think?

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Canadian government documents recently obtained as part of a lawsuit meant to block the production of genetically modified (GM) salmon show that, contrary to claims made by producer AquaBounty Technologies, the GM salmon actually grow more slowly and are more prone to disease than non-GM farmed salmon.

The documents raise questions about the viability and safety of the fish that have not been considered by the FDA as it ponders whether to approve the fish for human consumption.

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