Saudi police detained a young woman for violating modesty rules after she removed her abaya, the loose-fitting, full-length robes women are required to wear, on a main street in the capital Riyadh, local media reported on Monday.

The conservative Muslim country enforces a strict dress code for women in public, bans them from driving and prohibits the mixing of sexes.

Read the Full Article: Source – Reuters
Time For Truth: (Reuters) – Saudi police detain young woman for removing abaya - media

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Locals are fuming because they are are only allowed into the site in the south-eastern Europe country if they are servants or cleaners.

The complex is surrounded by heavy security, gates and high walls and the locals think it is unlawful for foreigners to buy up part of the country and then ban them from entering.

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Saudi Arabia is poised to launch its first ever international bond sale on Wednesday as the kingdom turns to debt markets to help ease a fiscal squeeze from the two-year slump in oil prices.

Banks connected to the sale said the Saudis are due to conclude a transatlantic roadshow on Tuesday for the dollar-denominated bond — one of the most eagerly awaited issues this year — after which they will release initial price guidance.

Read the Full Article: Source – CNBC
Time For Truth: (CNBC) – Saudis set to launch first international bond sale on Wednesday

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A deal by major oil exporters to freeze output may have to wait another couple of months.

As producing countries gather in Algiers for talks on Wednesday, Saudi Arabia signaled for the first time it may accept the idea that Iran keep output at maximum levels but doesn’t expect an accord to be reached this week. A deal in November is possible, Saudi Oil Minister Khalid Al-Falih said in a briefing in the Algerian capital.

Read the Full Article: Source – Bloomberg
Time For Truth: (Bloomberg) – Saudis See Oil-Freeze Deal Possible in November, Not This Week

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Mohammed Idrees used to travel to London once or twice a year, but these days the Saudi civil servant is asking his wife and children to cut back on using the family car to save fuel and has installed a solar panel for the kitchen to reduce electricity costs.

For decades, Saudi nationals such as Mr. Idrees enjoyed a cozy lifestyle in the desert kingdom as its rulers spent hundreds of billions of dollars of its oil revenue to subsidize essentials such as fuel, water and electricity.

Read the Full Article: Source – Wall Street Journal
Time For Truth: (Wall Street Journal) – Kingdom Comedown: Falling Oil Prices Shock Saudi Middle Class

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