In September, both Apple and Google announced plans to encrypt information on iOS and Android devices by default. Almost immediately, there was a collective freakout by law enforcement types. But, try as they might, these law enforcement folks couldn’t paint any realistic scenario of where this would be a serious problem. Sure, they conjured up scenarios, but upon inspection they pretty much all fell apart. Instead, what was clear was that encryption could protect users from people copying information off of phones without permission, and, in fact, the FBI itself recommends you encrypt the data on your phone.

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More people than ever own smartphones, but nearly half say they rarely use the handheld gadget to make phone calls, a new study suggests.

A survey, conducted by taxi app Hailo, found the average person uses their smartphone for nearly two hours a day, but mostly to send text messages, receive emails and browse the internet.

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An agent of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is being sued for using images and information taken from an arrested New York woman’s cellphone and using them to attempt to trick others into providing secrets about an illicit drug operation.

Buzzfeed originally reported on the situation, detailing how Sondra Arquiett was originally arrested in July 2010 for possession with intent to distribute cocaine. Upon her arrest, Arquiett did agree to help federal prosecutors, however, in court filings she states that she never explicitly allowed the DEA to gather pictures from her cellphone and create a fake account.

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A Tic-tac-toe game is actually a new mobile trojan – detected as Trojan-Spy,AndroidOS.Gomal.a, or Gomal – targeting Android devices.

Gomal is capable of recording audio from the microphone, stealing incoming SMS messages, stealing device information such as cell phone number, obtaining root privileges, dumping memory regions of some processes in order to obtain sensitive data, and stealing data from the device log, Victor Chebyshev, a Kaspersky Lab expert, told SCMagazine.com in a Friday email correspondence.

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Google GOOGL -2.27% already scans users’ Gmail email accounts to show more relevant ads. Now the Internet giant is scouring emails for bills.

The company said Tuesday that its Google Search mobile app can now remind users when bills are due by spotting emailed bills in their Gmail accounts and automatically reading the important details.

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